Tag: CPAP mask

Side effects of CPAP masks therapy

Side effects of CPAP masks therapy

Although it has a few potential negative effects, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which is used to treat obstructive sleep apnea, is generally safe. The most frequent complaints are related to air pressure or discomfort from the mask itself, and these problems may often be resolved by adjusting your machine’s settings or your mask’s fit.

Don’t make these modifications on your own since CPAP is a prescription treatment with many factors to take into account or you might encounter negative consequences.

Related: Read this before getting those CPAP masks

CPAP Masks Leaking Air

Air leaks are by far the most typical CPAP-related complaint. Air may leak around the edges of the CPAP masks if it does not fit snugly, particularly if you change positions while you sleep.

Leaks are more likely to occur with larger CPAP masks, such as those that cover the mouth and nose. Leaks might hinder your treatment by decreasing the amount of pressure applied, or they could be loud and wake up your bed mate.

By utilizing a nasal mask or nasal cushions, air leakage may be minimized. Changing the pressure settings for your CPAP masks might sometimes assist if the fit is a problem for you.

If there is too much air pressure, the extra air leaks out of the mouth or around the edges of the mask. Before making any changes, talk this over with your doctor.

Skin rashes or marks

If your CPAP masks doesn’t fit correctly, it might leave markings on your skin and cause sores or even ulcers, particularly around the bridge of your nose. A rash or skin irritation may also occur in those with sensitive skin, particularly when latex-containing CPAP masks are used.

These symptoms may be alleviated by mask liners, barrier lotions, relaxing the mask, or a better-fitting mask.

Dryness of the Mouth or Nose

Leakage is often accompanied by dryness in the mouth or nose. This might cause nosebleeds or possibly harm to your teeth and gums. A parched mouth or tongue might result from opening your mouth wide.

An over-the-counter nasal saline spray might assist if your nose is dry.

You may avoid drying out by using heated humidifiers and heated tubing. You may use a chinstrap or a full-face mask that covers your nose and mouth to prevent your mouth from opening.

Difficulty in exhaling

When you first begin utilizing CPAP treatment, you could find it challenging to breathe out against the pressure even when it is simple to breathe in. Over time, this could get better, but the effort can also keep you up at night.

It may be beneficial in certain circumstances to ramp up from a lower starting pressure or include a function that makes exhaling simpler. It could be required to lower all pressures. Bi-level treatment, which involves breathing in at one pressure and exhaling at a lower pressure, may be necessary in rare circumstances.

Side effects of CPAP masks therapy

Swallowing Air

Aerophagia, the act of ingesting air, is common (literally “air eating”). Aerophagia may be to blame if you wake up with air in your stomach.

Among the signs are: bloating, farting, and burping.

Swallowing air may indicate excessive CPAP pressures. The extra air may enter your stomach via your esophagus rather than your upper airway.

Reduced pressures might aid in avoiding this. The usage of wedge pillows when sleeping, GERD and heartburn drugs, and bi-level therapy are further therapies for aerophagia.

The emergence of central sleep apnea

Some persons may begin to have bouts of the breath holding associated with central sleep apnea after beginning CPAP treatment. If central apneas did not account for the bulk of your breathing disruptions before to commencing CPAP but now account for more than five occurrences per hour, you may have complicated sleep apnea. 4

Sometimes, this goes away with time, and it could be treated by by reducing the CPAP pressure. Adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) therapy, in which the air volume and speed may be adjusted to vary based on your demands, may sometimes be necessary as a change in treatment.

Facial growth issues in children

Children who use CPAP should be closely watched to prevent midface development issues brought on by the pressure of the mask over the nose.

Nasal cushions and other modern mask designs may lessen this danger.

Claustrophobia

When wearing a mask, some individuals feel constrained or contained. If you take the time to gradually become used to wearing the mask, this usually gets better with time.

Talk to your healthcare professional about claustrophobia remedies if you have difficulty using your CPAP masks due to claustrophobia.

Loud Sound

For the person you sleep with in particular, the noise might be disruptive to sleep. Even though the technology being utilized now is far quieter than it was in the past, it can take some getting used to. Overall, snoring, which is highly frequent with obstructive sleep apnea, is more difficult for spouses to get used to than the predictable sounds of CPAP.

Side effects of CPAP masks therapy

Sex Drive

Some individuals may object that wearing CPAP masks is uncomfortable and could reduce sex desire in one or both partners. If this is a problem, it is important to openly discuss it with your spouse in order to determine when you will wear it and how to prevent having bad sentiments about the CPAP masks.

Changing the CPAP setting

The CPAP machine’s pressure settings may sometimes need to be changed if your obstructive sleep apnea risk factors change. This may be essential for a number of reasons, including:

Weight fluctuations: 

Losing weight may cause issues with air swallowing, mask leaks, or difficulty breathing out against the pressure. Being overweight increases your chance of developing sleep apnea. It could help to reduce your CPAP pressure. A modification in CPAP pressure may also be necessary due to weight increase.

Allergies: 

If you suffer from environmental allergies, effective therapy with drugs or nasal sprays may be able to lower your need for pressure by enhancing nasal airflow.

Surgical procedures: 

You may need different amounts of CPAP treatment after having a tonsillectomy, a nasal septoplasty, or soft palate or tongue surgery.

Substance abuse: 

Smoking may make sleep apnea and snoring worse. Alcohol use just before night might relax your muscles and make your obstructive sleep apnea symptoms worse. Your pressure requirements can decrease if you stop using any of these drugs.

Medication: 

Drugs like benzodiazepines and muscle relaxants may make your symptoms worse. If you stop using them, your need for pressure can decrease.

Keep in mind that your settings should be adjusted by your healthcare practitioner. Making the decision on your own might be risky.

Read this before getting those CPAP masks

Read this before getting those CPAP masks

Approximately 22 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, which has varied degrees of severity. CPAP treatment, which employs continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to assist the patient in maintaining regular breathing patterns while sleeping, is one strategy for reducing the symptoms of the illness.

A CPAP machine has numerous elements, some of which may be adjusted so that you can have the most effective and sleep apnea comfortable treatment possible. While some alternatives allow for visual customization, it’s more crucial to choose cpap masks that fits your sleep preferences and other requirements.

Related: Problems and side effects associated with CPAP masks

We have a guide detailing the various CPAP masks, but it is worthwhile going through the key distinctions between the two most common choices, full-face CPAP masks and nasal pillows.

CPAP Full-Face Mask

You usually picture the full-face mask that rests over the patient’s airways and is pretty bulky and huge when you picture the classic CPAP machine configuration. The fact that this is a non-invasive solution that rests on the face rather than within an airway makes it ideal for anybody who sleeps on their back or has claustrophobia, even if some patients find these CPAP masks to be unpleasant.

For those who mouth breathe or have allergies that make it difficult to breathe through the nose, full-face CPAP masks are also beneficial. Patients who need a high air pressure setting for their CPAP treatment may also benefit from a full-face mask because of the structure’s ability to create a tighter seal.

Read this before getting those CPAP masks

Patients should be advised that full-face CPAP masks may move about during active sleep, induce eye dryness from air leaking from the top of the mask, and be challenging to use when wearing glasses.

Due to their smaller size and wider range of view, nasal pillows are a common option for those with low to moderate air pressure needs. As opposed to nasal pillows, which sit at the nose opening and allow airflow that way, full-face CPAP masks make it impossible to read or watch television before going to bed.

Nasal pillows can provide active sleepers additional mobility without running the danger of compromising the seal. Another thing to think about is facial hair since nasal pillows work better for those with facial hair because they are less likely to obstruct airflow.

The disadvantage of a nasal cushion is the direct passage of pressurised air into the nostrils, which in some people may be uncomfortable and in others can lead to nose dryness and bleeding.

The good cannot exist without the evil. These fundamental principles of life are applicable to CPAP therapy. Here are eight strategies to help you adjust to CPAP therapy more easily, so you can sleep better and enjoy therapy more.

Leaks

A mask leak is irritating in and of itself, but the dampness and rubbing of the mask on your skin also causes skin chafing and rashes. Replacing the cushion on your specific mask usually solves the problem of a leaky mask.

Read this before getting those CPAP masks

Soreness

When starting their CPAP treatment for the first time, many patients report feeling sore. But your CPAP just has to be broken in, much like a nice pair of shoes. Additionally, if your face features are more pronounced, the mask may not suit you as well. Many CPAP users experience pain on the bridge of their nose, which is often where the top of the full face mask lays. Try the a nasal pad, which acts as a barrier between the mask and your nose’s bridge, to eliminate this difficulty. Another choice would be to get a smaller or bigger mask depending on the size and form of your particular face. Try a nasal pillow mask instead of a full-face mask if you find that it gives you a lot more movement for individuals who have trouble falling asleep.

Claustrophobia

Billy Bob Thornton, an actor, is the only person who has ever been documented to have a clinical dread of old furniture, yet there are literally millions of instances of claustrophobia worldwide. There are several strategies for CPAP users, especially new ones, to get over their claustrophobia. You might, for example, attempt certain breathing techniques to make donning a mask seem less confining, suffocating, or restrained. Another choice is to use a nasal pillows mask or a less-obtrusive full-face mask like the Amara View, which enables you to free up most of your face save for the tube. 

Facial Hair

Before beginning CPAP masks therapy, you didn’t think your beard was all that cool, did you? In fact, CPAP therapy might be a bit unpleasant even if you have a five o’clock shadow. To get the most out of your CPAP therapy, you don’t have to give up your characteristic scruff or stockpile; all you need is a mask with a stronger seal. However, the Roll Fit Cushion, which enables the mask’s bottom to fit precisely under your chin’s contours, is its finest feature. The straps on this mask also make it quite simple to custom fit the mask, allowing you to choose your ideal comfort zone. Don’t let your CPAP masks deprive your beard of its championship title since it has undoubtedly faced off against many opponents, including your wife, mother, and employer. Choose the simpler nasal pillow CPAP masks if you seal your mouth when you sleep.

The mask does not remain in place in a straight line and does not fit well.

When it comes to the fit of your CPAP masks, it should never be too tight or too loose; rather, it should fit securely but comfortably, much like a great pair of socks that has just been purchased. There are a variety of potential causes at play if your mask does not fit you properly and securely. Check to see if you can change the headgear; it’s possible that it wasn’t set up to accommodate the size of your head in the first place. This is the easiest problem to solve.

Final thoughts

With this, you should have enough that’ll help you make a good buying decision.

Problems and side effects associated with CPAP masks

Problems and side effects associated with CPAP masks

Most CPAP masks users would agree that utilizing the CPAP masks has its own set of issues and adverse effects. We’ll be addressing some of the major issues and negative consequences related to CPAP masks in this post.

While elbows are a component of the mask, tubes may snag them.

The L-shaped connection used in full-face mask designs is called an elbow connector. It’s simple to assume a new cpap mask won’t fit since they often feature easy release options that leave part of the mask within the tube. In actuality, a portion of the mask is still in the tube. You’ll believe your mask and tube aren’t connected if you neglect to remove a piece from an old tube or if you acquire a new mask but the old one’s still in the tube.

You’ll probably need to buy a new mask if you lose or break the elbow. It’s also important to routinely change your mask and tubing to prevent stretching. Every three months, CPAP tubes and mask frames are covered by insurance companies to be sure they have proper seals.

Short tubes, not CPAP tubing, are a component of the mask.

The small tube that often comes with nasal pillow or nasal cushion CPAP masks is frequently mistaken for the main CPAP tube. You’ll discover that these, however, are much too short and cannot be attached to your CPAP. To put a new mask into your tubing, you must first remove the short tube.

All CPAP masks are compatible with oxygen adapters, but not all tubing.

Oxygen adapters enable people to bleed oxygen into their CPAP masks and connect between the mask and tube. They work with all CPAP masks and common tubing without exception. However, there can be limitations on the kind of adaptor you require if you have hot tubing.

The heated tube is specially designed with an oxygen port already built in. It also includes:

  • A smart algorithm called auto-titration will automatically modify your therapeutic pressure. 
  • Expiratory Pressure Relief (EPR) lowers pressure when you exhale to prevent high pressure mask leaks.
  • Humidification: A heated tube and 7 levels of humidity make sure you don’t dry out.

Make sure you have all the components of the CPAP masks before attempting to connect a CPAP mask and tube. If your tubing is too old or loose, it may be the cause of your new mask’s (with its associated connection) failure to attach to it.

Another frequent problem is that when you attempt to disconnect the mask, old elbows or connection pieces remain in the tube, making it hard to insert a new type mask into the tube.

Problems and side effects associated with CPAP masks

Signs That a CPAP Needs to be Replaced

You may need to weigh the advantages of replacing against the return on investment if a client is renting a CPAP. However, because insurance often covers a large portion of the expense, it is to everyone’s advantage to keep your consumers aware about any signs that could suggest a new unit is required. The machine has to be checked if snoring intensifies or if they have a recurrence of the symptoms. It is important to report any changes to warning lights or sounds as soon as possible.

It is not advisable to discard used CPAP masks in the garbage. You must manage them with a qualified electronics recycler, just as any medical electronic waste.

The 7 most typical side effects of CPAP masks (and Ways to Avoid Them)

For treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), CPAP therapy is regarded as the gold standard since it is secure, non-invasive, and most importantly, successful. But it does carry the possibility of adverse consequences, just like any other therapeutic choice.

Although most CPAP side effects are minor, some individuals find them to be so inconvenient that they stop using the device to treat their sleep apnea. Fortunately, these symptoms are also simple to address, so try the suggestions below before giving up on CPAP.

The most frequent issues brought on by using a CPAP have been listed, along with solutions or techniques to prevent them.

Side Effects of CPAP and Solutions

Congestion of the nose

Nasal congestion or irritation is one of the most frequent adverse reactions to CPAP treatment. These symptoms may include a runny or stuffy nose, a burning sensation, or nosebleeds.

Dry, pressured air passing through the sinuses causes nasal congestion, which may be especially prevalent in those who have regular sinus infections.

How to Avoid It 

  • Use a nasal saline spray to moisten your nasal passages for temporary relief.
  • You should think about utilizing a CPAP humidifier for long-term care. 

Your airflow is humidified with moisture to reduce dryness and calm irritability. A heated humidifier provides additional comfort by subtly warming the air while it moisturizes for a more organic sensation.

Problems and side effects associated with CPAP masks

Dry Mouth

Mouth breathers often experience dry mouth or a dry throat upon awakening, which, like nasal congestion, is brought on by inhaling dry, pressured air.

Due to “mouth leak,” it may also occur to persons who use a nasal pillow mask or nasal mask, but it happens more often to those who use full face CPAP masks. When you sleep with your lips open, mouth leaks happen because when you exhale, air pressure escapes through your open mouth.

How to Avoid It 

  • A CPAP humidifier will supply moisture to soften your airflow, regardless of the style of mask you select.
  • If you use a nasal mask or nasal pillow mask, think about adding a chinstrap. CPAP chinstraps are intended to be worn in conjunction with your CPAP machine and help keep your mouth softly closed while you sleep.

Dry Eyes

Dry eyes when you awaken are a strong symptom of a mask leak. As you sleep, the departing air rushes over your face and dries your eyes. Given that the quantity of leaking might vary depending on your sleeping position during the night, you might not even realize it.

How to Prevent It

  • Check to see that your mask fits correctly before continuing. Since your face shape varies when you lie down, recheck the fit while in your favourite sleeping position.
  • Verify that your headwear is neither excessively tight or too loose. Although it goes without saying that slack straps might create air leaks by preventing your cushion from properly closing, an excessively tight fit can also result in leaks.
  • Hold the cushion just above your face if your kind of mask needs it to inflate so that the CPAP pressure may build up.

It could be time to replace your mask if it leaks even after being reinstalled. Replace your cushions every 2-4 weeks, your mask frame every 3 months, and your headgear every 6 months to maintain the efficacy of your sleep treatment.

Gas, Burping, and Bloating

Aerophagia, a condition where one swallows air, is more likely at higher pressure settings. Continuous positive airway pressure might end up diverting into your esophagus when breathing against it becomes challenging. Bloating, burping, stomach discomfort, and gassy passage are signs of aerophagia.

How to Prevent It 

  • Discuss changing your pressure settings with your physician or sleep expert. Without the guidance of a medical professional or sleep expert, you should never try to change your pressure settings.

Other resources:

How Resmed Airsense 10 CPAP Machine Can Help Treat Your Sleep Apnea Symptoms
How to Avoid Rainout, Water, and Moisture in Tubing And Masks of Your CPAP Machine

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